2018 DOC WEEK: 306 HOLLYWOOD with Co-director Jonathan Bogarin

2018 | 82 minutes | |
Co-directed by Elan Bogarin, Jonathan Bogarin

Friday August 03, 2018

SPECIAL EVENT

$15 General Admission, $12 Member,
$7 child age 14 or younger
Doors Open for admissions 30 min. prior to screening
Buy tickets at Film Center or online now BUY TICKETS

Co-directed by Elan Bogarin, Jonathan Bogarin
Written by Elan Bogarin, Jonathan Bogarin
Executive Produced by Laurie David and Geralyn Dreyfous

Co-director Jonathan Bogarin will join us for a Q&A afterward. 

306 Hollywood is a magical realist documentary of two siblings who undertake an archaeological excavation of their late grandmother’s house. They embark on a journey from her home in New Jersey to ancient Rome, from fashion to physics, in search of what life remains in the objects we leave behind.

 

Elan + Jonathan Bogarín are siblings born and raised in NYC. Together they run El Tigre Productions, where they produce innovative non-fiction films and digital content for the world’s leading museums. Their first feature, 306 Hollywood, premiered on opening night of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival as the first documentary ever to be included in the festival’s NEXT section. The film will be released theatrically as part of the Sundance Creative Distribution Fellowship, broadcast on POV / PBS, and streamed on Amazon. They were chosen for Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Independent Film in 2017 and have received support from the Sundance Institute, Just Films/Ford Foundation, Latino Public Broadcasting, NYSCA, Artemis Rising Foundation, Experimental Television Center, IFP, and they won the audience award for best pitch at the 2017 Hot Docs Forum. 

 

"306 Hollywood feels simultaneously like the sort of heartfelt little film that often slips through the cracks without finding an audience and like one of the more universal and relatable films you're ever likely to see."--Dan Fienberg

"There is a commendable boldness to this story in how it plays various documentary storytelling instruments, such as voiceover, reenactments, or using archival material. With the brother and sisters’ voices alternating as they talk about memories of their grandmother, it becomes a type of joint diary between the two, welcoming us into their collective heart"--Nick Allen, RogerEbert.com

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