2017 MV Environmental Film Festival: A PLASTIC OCEAN

| 2016 | 102 mins. | | ,
Craig Leeson

Saturday May 27, 2017


$12 General Admission, $9 Member,
$7 child age 14 or younger
Doors Open for admissions 30 min. prior to screening
Buy tickets at Film Center or online now BUY TICKETS

Craig Leeson
Adam Leipzig, Jo Ruxton,

Special guest, Jennifer Smith Turner will read her poem, SEA LIFE

JenniferSmithTurnerJennifer Smith Turner is the author of two poetry books, Lost and Found, Rhyming Verse Honoring African American Heroes and Perennial Secrets, Poetry & Prose. Her third poetry collection, Flirting with Truth, is currently being considered for publication. 

Jennifer’s poems are included in several anthologies – Vineyard Poets, an anthology of poems by Martha’s Vineyard writers; Legacy of Light: Poems for the Gay Head Lighthouse; and in the Union College Upward Bound Anthology. Her poems frequently appear in the MV Gazette. She retired to Martha’s Vineyard in 2012 with her husband, Eric.

REEFS AT RISK (12 mins) plays before A PLASTIC OCEAN

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Set on the beautiful beaches of Hawaii, “Reefs at Risk” explores the harmful effects some sunscreen chemicals have on coral reefs and marine life.  A film by Malina Fagan & Lynn Pelletier.

Coral reefs are dying at an alarming rate. Why should you care? Coral reefs protect our shores and supply food and oxygen to our planet. They are considered the “rainforests of the sea.” Although there are many factors contributing to the destruction of coral reefs worldwide, toxic chemicals in sunscreens is one we can easily eliminate. This timely film takes you underwater to explore the marine environment and follows those on land trying to protect it. The film also questions the effects these chemicals may have on humans and presents solutions.

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A Plastic Ocean is a new feature-length adventure documentary that brings to light the consequences of our global disposable lifestyle. We thought we could use plastic once and throw it away with negligible impact to humans and animals. That turns out to be untrue. In A Plastic Ocean, an international team of adventurers, researchers, and Ocean ambassadors go on a mission around the globe to uncover the shocking truth about what is truly lurking beneath the surface of our seemingly pristine Ocean. The result will astound viewers–just as it did our adventurers–who captured never-before-seen images of marine life, plastic pollution, and its ultimate consequences for human health. During its four-year production period, A Plastic Ocean was filmed in 20 locations around the world in beautiful and chilling detail to document the global effects of plastic pollution–and introduce workable technology and policy solutions that can, if implemented in time, change things for the better.

Special Guests for discussion: Signe Benjamin for VCS and Nina Carter Hitchen for Zero Waste.

hearn famSigne Benjamin was born and raised on Martha’s Vineyard, leaving for College in Boulder, CO. After graduating with a BA in Cultural Anthropology, her love of travel took her to South America where she lived and worked in Urubamba, Peru. She traveled back and forth between South America, Colorado and the Vineyard. In 2002 her first son was born and she and her husband decided to move back to the Vineyard full time to raise their family. She has worked at the Vineyard Conservation Society since 2008 as the membership and events coordinator.

untitled (1 of 1)-17Nina is an interior designer who lives with her husband and 6 year old twins in Oak Bluffs. Her journey to “life without plastic” began when she was pregnant and decided to rid her kitchen of plastic – concerned about its health effects – originally thinking only in terms of food preparation and storage. Along the way she learned about the Zero Waste movement and the facts of plastic pollution – and was inspired by Bea Johnson of “Zero Waste Home”, Lauren Singer of “Trash is for Tossers” and Beth Terry of “My Plastic Free Life” to quit plastic altogether. She has traded disposables for reusables and has learned how to grocery shop plastic-free on Martha’s Vineyard – by shopping from bulk bins, bringing her own containers for meat and deli goods, and saying no to plastic-packaged produce. She shares her journey on Facebook (“Plastic Free on MV”) and Instagram (@little.house.on.the.vineyard)

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