Film Club: FRIED GREEN TOMATOES

| 1991 | 130 minutes | |
Directed by Herbert Ross

Wednesday July 20, 2016


$9 General Admission, $7 Member, children ages 14 or younger, & Bunch of Grapes discount card holders, who must purchase tickets at the door to receive the discount
Doors Open for admissions 30 min. prior to screening
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Directed by Herbert Ross

Kathy Bates, Jessica Tandy, Mary Stuart Masterson, Mary-Louise Parker

A woman learns the value of friendship as she hears the story of two women and how their friendship shaped their lives in this warm comedy-drama. Evelyn Couch (Kathy Bates) is an emotionally repressed housewife with a habit of drowning her sorrows in candy bars. Her husband Ed (Gailard Sartain) barely acknowledges her existence, and while he visits his aunt at a nursing home every week, Evelyn is not permitted to come into the room because the old women doesn’t like her. One week, while waiting out Ed’s visit, Evelyn meets Ninny Threadgoode (Jessica Tandy), a frail but feisty old woman who lives at the same nursing home and loves to tell stories. Over the span of several weeks, she spins a whopper about one of her relatives, Idgie (Mary Stuart Masterson). Back in the 1920s, Idgie was a sweet but fiercely independent woman with her own way of doing things who ran the town diner in Whistle Stop, Alabama. Idgie was very close to her brother Buddy (Chris O’Donnell), and when he died, she wouldn’t talk to anyone except Buddy’s girl, Ruth Jamison (Mary-Louise Parker). Idgie gave Ruth a job at the cafe after she left her abusive husband, Frank Bennett (Nick Searcy). Between her habit of standing up for herself, standing up to Frank, and serving food to Black people out the back of the diner, Idgie raised the ire of the less tolerant citizens of Whistle Stop, and when Frank mysteriously disappeared, many locals suspected that Idgie, Ruth, and their friends may have been responsible. Evelyn finds herself looking forward to her weekly visits with Ninny, and is inspired by her story to take a new pride in herself and assert her independence from Ed. Fried Green Tomatoes was based on the novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by actress-turned-author Fannie Flagg, who makes a cameo appearance as the leader of a self-help group.friedgreentomatoes

 

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"Fried Green Tomatoes is fairly predictable, and the flashback structure is a distraction, but the strength of the performances overcomes the problems of the structure." - Roger Ebert Chicago Sun Times

"Fried Green Tomatoes is a thoroughly enjoyable movie-going experience, replete with laughter, tears, triumph, and tragedy." - James Berardinelli ReelViews

FILM CLUB
Have you ever wished you had the opportunity to talk about a film with other audience members while it's still fresh in your mind?

We surely have! So, to allow those conversations to happen, we introduce FILM CLUB. Much like what a book club is for readers, FILM CLUB is for film-goers -- an hour or so after various films throughout the summer that will allow you to analyze, discuss and contemplate the film you just watched.

FILM CLUB will meet after various first-run features at the Film Center throughout the summer, but also after classic film fare at the Capawock.
We are excited to announce a partnership with the Bunch of Grapes Bookstore on a series of great films based on great books. Each post-screening discussion will include discussion about the differences (and similarities) between the book and the movie version of the story, as well as analysis of the movie as a stand-alone piece of work.

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